Month: March 2022

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The Psychology of Anti-Vaxxers

To avoid potential controversy, I’m going to preface this post with this: get vaccinated. Vaccines save lives. That statement should seem obvious, and yet the past years have seen the rise of the antivaxx movement. Why? Part of the answer is a conspiracy mentality: believing in a sinister, clandestine elite that tricks the masses with […]

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Battle of the Brains

War is bad[citation needed]. There are obvious physical repercussions for civilians caught in the crossfire, as is documented in the daily news coverage in Ukraine – the endless bombings, brutality, and deaths are a tragic reality for Ukrainians. However, there are also substantial risks to the mental health of civilians, especially for children, who are […]

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The Mental Health Climate

It’s obvious just how much the pandemic is affecting our mental health – but it is not the only thing. A recent United Nations climate report puts mental health at the forefront of the many climate-related issues our world is facing. Not only are younger populations indirectly affected by climate anxiety, but those who live […]

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Fighting on Two Fronts

*Note: since this entry is so long, I have split it up into multiple paragraphs. Only the last one is my opinion on the matter.             While pointless war and unspeakable violence rage in Ukraine, we are waging our own war at home, argues a recent Slate article. Like soldiers on the front line, healthcare workers […]

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Schizophrenic.nyc

The Shortcomings of Health Care Part 2

The former director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Thomas Insel, writes in his book, “Healing,” that although during his directorship countless medical breakthroughs led to reductions in death rates from heart problems and infections, the nation’s mental health crisis ballooned out of control. Today, suicide kills three times as many people as […]

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COVID-19’s Effects on the Brain

In the largest study of COVID-19 and mental health to date, researchers from the Veterans Administration and Washington University in St. Louis found that COVID-19 survivors had a 35% higher risk of developing anxiety, 39% for depression, 41% for sleep disorders, and 80% for neurocognitive decline, or “brain fog,” in layman’s terms. Antidepressant use increased […]

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